Tag Archives: college

It is Easy to Do Something, Difficult to do the Right Thing

Post-Graduate Blues

I graduated two years ago from college and there is one striking observation that I think warrants some attention. College graduates really have it tough nowadays. If you take a moment to skim the headlines, it is easy to realize that the state of post-graduates in talked about in the news fairly regularly. You’ll hear stories about how graduates are having a hard time finding employment and you’ll hear stories about how graduates are being underemployed, which is to say that their current employment under-utilizes the skills gained from their expensive education. For instance, no one went to school for four years with the intention of becoming a barista at Starbucks. Nonetheless, you’ll also hear a lot of stories about graduates who are employed. While I haven’t been under-employed, I do fall into the other two categories. Now, more then ever, I truly believe that graduates have to make their way through there post-graduate lives with a focus on the center.

Leaning Your Ladder Against the Wrong Wall

Two years out of college, I’ve realized that it is very easy to do something, but it’s very difficult to do the right thing. I’ll explain this further. Have you ever gotten so caught up, that it has really felt like momentum has pushed you forward rather than desire? I think that it is very easy to get comfortable with something gives you a certain sense of security. When you’re in that state of comfort, it can be very easy to keep working on something further, if only because it is providing you a sense of achievement. The scary part happens when you take a moment of pause and reflection. I think that many people at a point like this likely have more questions than answers. If you’re walking up a ladder, then you’re making progress towards the top, but if you make it to the top and find that you’ve leaned your ladder against an incorrect wall, then that progress can become less significant. It is easy to do something and it’s normal to want to find that position of security, but I think that it’s more important to focus on and to do what feels right. It takes aptitude to do something well, but courage to do something great… and something great doesn’t have to be big. It just has to be right.


Why Not Rushing to Accept a Position After College Has Turned Out to Be Blessing in Disguise

I’ve noticed that it’s become a trend for influencers on Linkedin to write about how a radical decision turned out to be one of the greatest choices they have ever made and that’s inspired me to write about my own. I think that during a time when we’re attempting to improve with a slowly regrowing economy, it’s essential to view stages in life as opportunities.

It’s that time when soon to be graduates are scrambling to finalize their plans after college. There’s definitely a lot of pressure involved and I remember that well. The truth is that I’m probably still at that stage, but my nascent realization is that it’s turned out to be a blessing in disguise. When you have the time to think about who you are, what you’re passionate about, and what inspires you, you have the ability to make profound discoveries.

Since graduating, I’ve had the time to expand my interests in ways I would’ve never thought possible. With the time to take risks and begin new projects, I’ve had the ability to expand my mind and gain an even better understanding of myself. While some interests have only grown, others have developed. It’s an extraordinary thing. If I want to start writing a book, I can do that. If I have an idea for a start up, I can begin to lay down the groundwork for that. If I want to write about something, I can start another blog. The takeaway is to be true to yourself. It’s important to take everything as an opportunity and above all else to stay true to yourself. Take control of your personal brand and use the Internet to your advantage. Not rushing into accepting a position after college has been a blessing in disguise.

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